SMART goal examples to reach your peak athletic performance

What is SMART goal setting? SMART goal setting is used in a variety of situations, both business and personal, but this method of getting things done and achieving goals can be particularly helpful when it comes to fitness.

SMART Goal Examples to Reach Your Peak Athletic Performance

What is SMART goal setting? SMART goal setting is used in a variety of situations, both business and personal, but this method of getting things done and achieving goals can be particularly helpful when it comes to fitness. 

To be a SMART goal, your goal must be Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound. Here are some examples of some SMART fitness goals that can help you reach your peak athletic performance. 

1. I will lose weight/gain muscle mass/go to the gym more.

Your SMART goal has to be specific. You can’t just pick something generic or difficult to explain. Setting a goal of just getting healthy is not a SMART goal at all. Healthy can mean so many different things. 

Be specific. You want to lose weight. You want to gain muscle mass. You want to go to the gym more. These are all specific SMART goals that make it difficult for you to excuse your way out of progress, because you either are or are not achieving them. There is no grey area.

2. I will lose X kilograms/gain X kilograms of muscle mass/go to the gym X days per week.

Your SMART goal must be measurable. How else will you really see if you’re making progress, if you can’t measure that progress? It all goes back to avoiding generic goals.

 If you have a generic goal, it’s easy to make up excuses for how you’re doing the best you can (when you’re really not). But when your goal is specific and measurable, there’s only the truth. You either are making progress and succeeding, or you’re not.

3. I will lose 20 pounds/gain 6-8 kilograms of skeletal muscle/go to the gym four days per week.

After you have a measurable, specific goal, you must have an attainable goal. Don’t set your sights so high that you’re reaching for something you’ll never get. That’s a surefire way to become discouraged.

Instead of trying to become the fastest man in the world, try to improve your personal best time for a kilometre interval. Instead of trying to lose 5 kilograms, try 2.5. Instead of going to the gym every day, go to the gym most days. 

4. I will…because I want to.

Your goal must be relevant to your life. You shouldn’t pick a goal just because you feel you ought to have that goal. You have to want it. If you don’t want the end results, you’ll never get them, because your heart just isn’t in it. 

5. I will lose 20 pounds in five months/gain 6-8 kilograms of skeletal muscle in five months/go to the gym four days per week consistently until the end of summer.

You have to set a timeline for yourself, or else you’ll feel like you have all the time in the world. Again, it becomes easier to make excuses when you know you have all kinds of time to lose that 5 kilograms. If you give yourself a deadline, you’ll be more likely to see results. 

Whether you’re an elite athlete looking to improve or a newcomer to the world of fitness, setting SMART goals can increase the likelihood of you actually achieving those goals.